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Hydriska (miniature water jar) decorated with wavy and plain bands,  found on the Timpone della Motta, Late Geometric, 2nd half 7th c. BC, National Archaeological Museum, Sibari.
Hydriska (miniature water jar) decorated with wavy and plain bands, found on the Timpone della Motta, Late Geometric, 2nd half 7th c. BC, National Archaeological Museum, Sibari.

V.G.3. Hydriska (miniature water jar) decorated with wavy and plain bands, found on the Timpone della Motta, Late Geometric, 2nd half 7th c. BC.

This nice little vase has two horizontal belly handles and one vertical neck handle.

The large hydriae can contain a very large amount of water, but small specimens like this one would fill only a few cups.

The thousands of miniature hydriskai brought to the Acropolis of the Timpone must have been especially produced for use in the sanctuary, because the type is largely absent from tomb- and household assemblages.

Special-purpose production is also apparent from the uniform decoration of the vessels. It usually consists of sets of plain horizontal lines, which makes this specimen a rather elaborate example.

During the Scavi Stoop rows of hydriskai were found placed against the frontal walls of Temple II and III, and later also against the wall around the Acropolis. It looks as if the vessels were left there after groups of people had carried out libations of water, each from her/his own jug.

The object is associated with Temple V.d, found on the Timpone della Motta, Scavi Kleibrink 1991-2004, no. AC17A.16.hy07.