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Plain-arch fibula with beads (‘fibula ad arco composito e staffa allungata’), Scavi Kleibrink 1991-2004, AP13.13. Length 11.3cm. Found on the Timpone della Motta. National Archaeological Museum, Sibari.
Plain-arch fibula with beads (‘fibula ad arco composito e staffa allungata’), Scavi Kleibrink 1991-2004, AP13.13. Length 11.3cm. Found on the Timpone della Motta. National Archaeological Museum, Sibari.

I.B.5. Fibula with plain arch with amber and bone beads

Only  three beads remain of the original set decorating the bow of this fibula.

When complete, the beads would have made the bow appear swollen like the bows of the attractive fully metal ‘leech fibulae’, which were popular in Italy in the 8th and 7th centuries BC.

Types with a long catch plate such as this specimen first occurred in the last decades of the 8th century BC and were still being produced in the 7th century BC.The type with beads was manufactured in Campania and occurs frequently in tombs at Pithekoussai on Ischia and sites along the Tyrrhenian coast.At Francavilla Marittima these Campanian fibulae first became fashionable in the last quarter of the 8th century BC, when Greek imported products became more frequent.These fibulae, too, were probably imported and not locally produced. Women of high rank in the late 8th century were buried with them, and with imported cups. It would be interesting to know whether dress fashion changed at the same time and became more Campanian.

At least some changes occurred, for heavy belts and belt pendants, for instance, disappeared from female graves. Tthis may  indicate that dresses with longer, belt-covering overfolds became popular.

The object is associated with Temple V.C. on the Timpone della Motta, Scavi Kleibrink 1991-2004. It is now in the National Archaeological Museum of the Sibaritide at Sibari.