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Bronze finger ring with four-spiral decoration, late 8th – early 7th century BC. Found on the Temple plateau of the Timpone della Motta during the Scavi Kleibrink 1991-2004. Now in the National Archaeological Museum for the Sibaritide at Sibari.
Bronze finger ring with four-spiral decoration, late 8th – early 7th century BC. Found on the Temple plateau of the Timpone della Motta during the Scavi Kleibrink 1991-2004. Now in the National Archaeological Museum for the Sibaritide at Sibari.
Bronze finger ring with four-spiral decoration, late 8th – early 7th century BC. Found on the Temple plateau of the Timpone della Motta during the Scavi Kleibrink 1991-2004. Now in the National Archaeological Museum for the Sibaritide at Sibari.
Bronze finger ring with four-spiral decoration, late 8th – early 7th century BC. Found on the Temple plateau of the Timpone della Motta during the Scavi Kleibrink 1991-2004. Now in the National Archaeological Museum for the Sibaritide at Sibari.

I.B. 5. Bronze ring with four spirals, Timpone della Motta

This type of ring, made of bent copper alloy wire, may have originated in Greece but the type is widespread.

Earlier, Protogeometric and Geometric, specimens have larger spirals. This type, with smaller spirals combined into an elegant rosette, is later; it may be placed in the late 8th or early 7th century BC.

Several versions of the type have been found in Greek sanctuaries (from Salamis on Cyprus and the island of Chios to Olympia and Pherai). Locally produced Italic bronze rings of this type are not yet known.

Its manufacture is fairly simple. Both ends of a copper alloy wire were split in two, and the ends thinned by hammering before rolling them into neat little spirals surrounding a lozenge-shaped centre.

Having all four spirals grouped around a centre is a trait the ring shares with older, locally produced four-spiral fibulae (Museum no. – to follow).

Almost certainly the spiral motif, a symbol of the sun and eternal life, contributed to the popularity of such rings.

This ring fits a thin female finger. 

The object is associated with Temple V.C on the Timpone della Motta. It was found during the Scavi Kleibrink 1991-2004 and is now in the National Archaeological Museum of the Sibaritide at Sibari.